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Schutzhund - General Rules and Regulations

Back

Part A - Degree Levels

Part B - Requirements

Part C - Point Score & Ratings

Part D - The Conduct of the Participants

Point Allocation in the Tracking Work:

BH Test
Heel on Leash. 15 points

Heel Free. 15 points

Down out of Motion with Recall.
10 points

Long Down under Distraction.
10 points

Part A - Degree Levels
Schutzhund Examination A - SchH A
Begleithunde Examination - BH
Schutzhund Examination I - Schl-l I
Schutzhund Examination Il - SchH II
Schutzhund Examination III - SchH III

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Part B - Requirements
The minimum age requirements for entry into the various degree levels are:
SchH A 18 months
SchH 1 18 months
Schl-l 11 19 months
Schl-l 111 20 months
FH 16 months
B 12 months

Evidence of prior achievement of the B title must be presented before entry into SchHI is permitted.

On any given day when one judge is officiating, a maximum of 10 (12 In USA) dogs may be entered in a trial. If the entries exceed this figure, the trial must be extended to another day or other judges must be secured to officiate.

Dogs are only allowed to be exhibited in one Schutzhund degree per scheduled trial. If a dog has been awarded a degree, a four week (two weeks in USA) waiting period must elapse before the dog can be exhibited for the next higher degree. Once a dog has earned a SchH III degree, it is up to the discretion of the handier when he/she wishes to exhibit the dog again. Dogs exhibited in a lower degree examination than actually earned by the dog shall be awarded rankings behind those who earned their degree at the scheduled trial. (This is for awards, trophies, placings, etc.) It is up to the discretion of the handier to repeat a Schutzhund degree without being bound by the waiting period, but not at the same scheduled trial date. It is also not permissible for a handier to participate in two trials on the same day.

Only dogs that appear healthy can be exhibited in a trial. Before being permitted to participate in a trial, each dog must pass a test of impartiality and sureness. The testing of the self confidence will take place during the entire trial. Dogs who fail the test of self confidence or impartiality are to be excused from the trial proceedings. A dog is to be dismissed from the trial, if it demonstrates faulty temperament during the trial even though the initial test for impartiality was positive.

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Part C - Point Score & Ratings
The highest maximum score in each phase shall be 100 points and therefore the highest point score in all three phases shall be 300 points. A degree can only be awarded if a dog achieves at least 70 points in phases A (tracking) and B (obedience) and at least 80 points in phase C (protection). The following ratings shall be awarded with the corresponding point totals:

Unsatisfactory 0 - 109 points
Insufficient 110 - 219 points
Satisfactory 220 - 239 points
Good 240 - 269 points
Very Good 270 - 285 points
Excellent 286 - 300 points

Should there be awards presented and in the case of a tie, the dog with the highest point score in phase C should receive the award. Should there still be a tie, the point score in phase B shall prevail.

For a SchH A, the highest possible point score is 200 points. The pass-score in this degree is a minimum of 70 points in phase B and a mini- of 80 points in phase C. The following ratings shall be awarded with the corresponding point totals:

Unsatisfactory 0 - 72 points
Insufficient 73 - 149 points
Satisfactory 150 - 159 points
Good 160 - 179 points
Very Good 180 - 190 points
Excellent 191 - 200 points

Awards for combativeness including courage and hardness are:

P -- Pronounced (Ausgepraegt)
S -- Satisfactory (Vorhanden)
I -- Insufficient (Nicht Genugend)

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Part D - The Conduct of the Participants
At the beginning of each trial after being summoned by name, each handler and dog shall report to the judge repeating the handlers as well as the dog's name. The dog must be leashed (unleashed in SchH 111) and is to sit in the basic heel position. The pedigree and registration certificate as well as the scorebook is to be presented to the trial secretary prior to the trial (scorebook only in USA). Should the hosting organization demand a membership or affiliation requirement, then a valid member-ship card must be presented.

Evidence of the prior achievement of a SchH I must be presented before entry into the FH is permitted. Dogs who do not possess the SchH before entry into the FH is permitted to enter for the FH provided they have attained the degree B (Companion Dog). In this case, the awarded title shall have no bearing in regards to breed show or breed survey rules and regulations.

Each participant must follow the instructions of the judge as well as those of the trial committee without any disagreement. The handler must exhibit the dog in a sporty and faultless manner. Ill-natured actions or Poor sportsmanship will lead to expulsion from the trial. The final decision in all cases rests with the presiding judge and the decision of the judge is unchallengeable. A protest is not permitted. In the event anyone is expelled from a trial by the judge or trial secretary, the USA Board of Inquiry will review the situation for further possible disciplinary action.

During the trial, the dog must be exhibited with a choke collar in the neutral position (dead ring). Leather and spike collars are not permitted. The handler may praise the dog only once after each exercise. Body help from the handler is not permitted and if used will be penalized by point deductions.

Handlers that possess physical handicaps that hinder movement of the dog on the left side of the handler can show dogs on the handler's right side. In such cases, the dog and handler will be judged without pre- as long as the performance is analogous to a left heeling dog.

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Point Allocation in the Tracking Work:

Trial Level

Start & 1. leg

1. corner & 2. leg

2. corner & 3. leg

3. corner & 4. leg

4. corner & 5. leg

5. corner & 6. leg

6. corner & 7. leg

7. corner & 8. leg

Article Points

SchH

27

27

 

 

 

 

 

 

10/10

SchH2

27

27

 

 

 

 

 

 

10/10

SchH3

16

16

16

16

16

 

 

 

7/7/6

1 FH 1

12

12

12

11

11

11

11

 

5/5/5/5

FH 2

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

6 x 3
1 x 2


Trial Level

Heel/lead
commd/pt

Heel/off
cmmd/pt

Sit
cd/p

Down
cd/p

Working
Stand cd/p

Running
Stand cd/p

BH

Heel 15

Heel 15

Heel, Sit 10

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

 

 

Part 1

Heel 15

Heel 20

Heel, Sit 10

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

 

 

SchH 1

Heel 15

Heel 20

Heel, Sit 10

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

 

 

SchH 2

Heel 10

Heel 15

Heel, Sit 5

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

 

 

SchH 3

 

Heel 10

Heel, Sit 5

Heel, Down
Come/Name
Heel

Heel, Stand,
Sit 5

Heel, Stand, Come/Name Heel 10


Trial Level

Retrieve Flat
cd/pt

Retrieve Jump
cd/pt

Retrieve
Wall cd/pt

Send Away
cd/pt

Long Down
cd/pt

BH Part 1

 

 

 

 

Down, Sit 10

SchH A

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

 

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

SchH 1

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

 

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

SchH 2

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

SchH 3

Fetch, Out, Heel 10

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Jump, Fetch, Out, Heel 15

Heel, Go, Down, Sit 10

Down, Sit 10

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Heel on Leash. 15 points
          
The paces shown in the above diagramme represent the minimum number of paces required.

Starting at the basic position, pick a target at the opposite end of the field so you'll be able to walk a straight line. Take a deep breath, give the heel command and walk forward purposefully, counting your paces. You will walk out 50+ paces in a straight line, do a Schutzhund (left) about turn, and continue back the way you came for 12 more paces at a normal speed. After 12 paces, command heel and run for 12 paces. The fast should be at a definite run, not just fast walking. You may want to flex your arms and lean forward slightly as you give the command. (It's not cheating when you help your dog by giving natural body cues. It's natural to look the direction you're turning when you walk, or to lean forward when you run. The key is "natural" - don't exagerate.) The command "heel" should be brisk and upbeat. After 12 paces, command heel again while bringing your arms down and leaning back slightly. This heel command may be slower or scale down tonally. The transition between fast and slow should be smooth and harmonious, not abrupt. For the slow, stop swinging your arms and shorten and slow your steps while maintaining smooth forward motion. If you pause or hesitate between each step, the result will appear choppy. After 12 paces, give the command heel and resume a normal pace.

When you reach the starting point, you will make a right (or left) turn (depending on the layout of the field and the judge's directions) walk 15+ paces and make another right (or left) turn. After 15+ paces, make a Schutzhund (left) about turn, and take a few paces before the halt to give your dog a chance to sit straight. Pause for a count of three before resuming heeling. You will make a left (or right) turn and heel into the group.

If, during the heeling, your dog lags or becomes distracted, it's often better to give an additional "heel" command than let him wander too far. You may lose points but hopefully you'll lose fewer than you would with faulty heeling.

Group. The group is the last part of the Heel on Lead exercise and the first part of the Heel Free exercise. Therefore, the only time that the dog may be praised is at the end of the on-lead heeling.

As you're approaching the group, choose two people in the group around whom you can smoothly make a figure-8. You must show a left turn, a right turn and a halt. The halt should be near a person; observe a 3-second pause before continuing. Look to the judge for direction: s/he will either nod that you should proceed out of the group or instruct you to repeat the figure-8.

Heel out of the group a short distance, make an about turn, take a few additional steps to give your dog a chance to be straight, and halt. Take the lead off and put it away before praising your dog. Give him a few quick pats or a verbal "atta-boy!" and assume a new basic position or mentally count to three before heeling back into the group.

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Heel Free. 15 points
Look back to the group and again pick a route before starting. (Planning ahead helps prevent confusion!) You must again show a left turn, right turn and halt. Look to the judge for a signal to preceed to the starting point for the off-lead heeling.

Assume a new basic position at the starting point. Look to the judge for a signal to begin heeling. You MAY NOT praise your dog at this point.

The Gunshots. With the exception of the gunshots, the heel free is the same pattern as the heel on leash. The gun will be fired two times, about 5 seconds apart, as you heel away on the first straight leg of the pattern. The first shot is fired when you're about 15 paces away. The judge may ask for additional shots to be fired if s/he sees any questionable reaction by the dog.

Sit out of Motion. 10 points At the end of the Heel-free, you will go back to the starting point and take up the basic position.

The Buildup. All of the moving exercises require a buildup of 10-15 paces with the dog at heel before the sit or down command is given, and the judge's do count! Get into the habit of counting 12 paces in training.

Beginning in the basic position, heel out in a straight line for 12 paces, and give the sit command without slowing or looking back. Continue walking at a normal pace for at least 30 steps. Stop and turn smoothly. Stand erect with your feet under your hips and your hands at your sides. Look to the judge for a signal to return to your dog. You may return by going around behind the dog, or walk directly to the dog's right side. (I have heard of judges taking points for returning directly to the dog; apparently they feel you demonstrate a more solid sit when returning around behind.)

You may count three and start the Moving Down from this basic position if the field is long enough, or you may do an about turn and heel back to the original starting point.

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Down out of Motion with Recall. 10 points
From the basic position, heel straight out 12 paces at a normal speed and give the down command without slowing or looking back. Continue walking on for at least 30 additional steps. If your dog has an awesome, speedy recall, you might want to consider going a little further. Stop and turn smoothly. Stand erect with your feet under your hips and your hands at your sides. Look to the judge for a signal to recall your dog. You may use either his name or the command "Hier" / "Come" but not both. Pause for 3 seconds (or wait for the judge's signal) before giving the finish command. The dog may do an "around" or "flip" finish.

Beware of handler-help on the recall. It is extremely common to lean forward or raise your shoulders as you give the command or to move your head and shoulders for the finish. Your feet should be directly under your hips, not straddled, and your hands should be held relaxed at your sides. Wait until the dog is looking at you before you give the command.

At the completion of the Moving Down exercise, put the leash back on the dog. You will either heel on-leash to the Long Down place or return to the judge for the critique.

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Long Down under Distraction. 10 points
When the judge tells or signals you to go to the long down location, heel over to the area. Stop, facing the direction you will be waiting, with your dog sitting at your side in the basic position. Take the lead off and put it away. Glance at the judge for a signal to begin the down exercise. Standing straight and facing forward, give the down command. When the dog has complied, walk away without turning approximately 30 paces out to the place indicated by the judge. Wait with your back to the dog.

Watch the other dog's routine so you'll be ready for the judge's signal when it's time to return to your dog. Walk directly back to your dog. You may circle around behind him or go directly to his right side and turn around. Standing straight, count mentally to three and give the "sit" command without leaning forward or giving other body signals. When he is sitting, put the lead back on and either heel to the judge or to the starting point for the obedience exercises.

In the BH test, all the points for the exercise are lost if the dog breaks the long down at any time and moves more than 3 metres away. If the dog is restless or sits up but remains within the allowable 3 metres, the dog may receive partial points. If a dog breaks the long down on the handler's return, it may receive no more than a Satisfactory rating (at least a 3-point deduction) for the exercise.

Both handlers report back to the judge at the completion of their routines. S/he will direct you to stand in front of the spectators for the critique. Sit or down your dog and face the crowd. Be a good sport: smile, say "thank you" and shake hands with the judge at the end of the critique.

A minimum of 42 points out of 60 are necessary in order to continue on to the traffic portion of the BH test.

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# Information supplied by:
Sally Cendak - Eagle Heights Sportdog Club Inc.
http://ehschutzhund.hypermart.net/

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